Thonik. If the concept is good, the rest will follow

Thomas Widdershoven and Nikki Gonnissen are, unequivocally, two of the Netherlands’ leading graphic designers. Together they form THONIK, a distinguished design studio that explores the boundaries of experiential visual communication and graphic design. The work of THONIK is internationally acclaimed, with recent exhibitions in Venice, Shanghai, Tokyo and Paris, in the famous Anatome gallery.

Steven Heller. Getting designers to think

Graphic design is his daily bread. Art director, journalist, critic, writer and editor, Steven Heller is co-chairing the course "MFA Designer as Author" and writes the Visuals column for the New York Times Book Review.

Modise Sepeng. ‘Work twice as hard’

The graphic artist from Alexandra (South Africa) is an aesthetic activist, using historical African influences to de-colonise the design landscape.

Hoefler & Frere-Jones. Font Men

You may not have heard of Jonathan Hoefler or Tobias Frere-Jones but you’ve seen their work. Before their recent split, they collectively ran the...

Anthony Burrill. Clear your head

The ‘Godfather of the graphic art scene’ is quite a title to uphold. Anthony Burrill however has proven many times over that he not only deserves it, but may indeed need promoting up the ranks a bit.

Christoph Niemann. Sunday Sketching

From award-winning artist and author Christoph Niemann comes a collection of witty illustrations and whimsical views on working creatively. Taking its cue from his New...

Peter Saville. Music and art

He has never made or produced a record, but Peter Saville is one of the most important people in British pop. Saville’s sleeve designs for OMD, Roxy Music and most famously, for Factory records have changed the way that we think about pop music. Along with his schoolfriend, Malcolm Garrett (the man responsible for the early Buzzcocks’ sleeves), Saville was a major player in a graphic design revolution that converged with the convulsions that were happening in pop at the end of the 1970s. If Jamie Reid’s cut and paste covers were the image equivalent of the punk sound, then Saville and Garrett’s more abstract, impersonal designs were the visual analogue of post-punk.

Jennifer Sterling Finally Gets the Last Word

Having lived and worked on both coasts, Jennifer Sterling knows a thing or two about cultural and political discourse in design. Her illustrative typographic renderings have produced praise and ignited loathsome critiques from her peers.

Marks Men. An Interview With Ivan Chermayeff, Tom Geismar, and Sagi...

The publication 'Identify: Basic Principles of Identity Design in the Iconic Trademarks of Chermayeff & Geismar' looks back at the last half century of work by Chermayeff & Geismar, the design studio behind many of the world’s most recognizable trademarks: Chase Bank, the Library of Congress, NBC, National Geographic, PBS, Showtime, and many others. Established in 1957, the firm helped pioneer the modern movement of idea-driven graphic design, and its projects span every discipline, including visual identities, exhibitions, print and motion graphics, and art in architecture. Print Magazine talked to Ivan Chermayeff, Tom Geismar, and Sagi Haviv, about swooshes (never!), whether Paul Rand shares responsibility for Enron (no), and who is really the boss (none of them).

Leta Sobierajski. This Is What Landing Your Dream Job Looks Like

Interview with Leta Sobierajski from a series of six profiles of young creatives who created their dream job. It’s a rare and very special thing to have a job that's the same as the one you referred to in grade school when everyone asked you what you wanted to be when you grew up. Heck, it’s rare to have the one you talked about at your college graduation party.

Moira Cullen. Happiness in a bottle

Moira Cullen, The PepsiCoCoca Design Director went down the right path during the redesign of Coke's identity. "It's happiness inside. Happiness in a bottle."

Akira Kobayashi. Letters Do Not Stand By Themselves

Like all type designers, Akira Kobayashi believes that good typography reinforces the meaning of the text. He has a background in art and calligraphy and has been a freelance type designer for 18 years. Originally from Japan, Akira is a frequent speaker at type conferences and workshops in Europe, the Americas and Asia, and he has served as a judge in prestigious international type design competitions.

Typostrate meets Ale Paul of Sudtipos

We open 2017 with an interview from our friends at Typostrate, a short Q&A with Ale Paul of Sudtipos. It’s supplemented with a video portrait, and some background on his latest Henderson Slab and Sans typefaces.

Brian Eno. Resonance

Resonance I like the idea of making things that exist quite happily without me being around them. In music, you talk about releasing records, and...

April Greiman. We’re just using the code

April Greiman has been called a pioneer, making it acceptable for a graphic designer to explore their craft using a computer. In the early '80s, computers were seen as science fiction props, specialized industry tools, or subverted novelties. The design community regarded them as an embarrassment to the long history and craft of an art form.