2Rebels’ Denis Dulude meets Max Kisman

As far as Denis Dulude is concerned, Montreal doesn't have much of a type tradition, and a well-known UK designer (he won't reveal his name yet) once told him that there was nothing happening in type design in his city. Max Kisman interviewed Montreal-based designer Denis Dulude, the founder and spokesman of 2Rebels.

Helvetica. A film about typography

Helvetica is a feature-length independent film about typography, graphic design and global visual culture. It looks at the proliferation of one typeface (which celebrated its 50th birthday in 2007) as part of a larger conversation about the way type affects our lives. The film is an exploration of urban spaces in major cities and the type that inhabits them, and a fluid discussion with renowned designers about their work, the creative process, and the choices and aesthetics behind their use of type.

William Drenttel & Jessica Helfand: 2013 AIGA Medalists

Designer, theorist and publisher William Drenttel is recognized for advancing critical thinking about design; for his long-standing commitment to integrating design strategy into organizations;...

Stefan Sagmeister. Don’t Take Creativity For Granted

Renowned designer Stefan Sagmeister talks about the process behind his typography-driven films, which sprung from the insights in his book Things I’ve Learned in My...

Tomato. Letting something grow

Tomato… A house hold name in our industry. This multi-disciplinary collective tackles almost anything creative. Among the mediums most noted would include; typography, graphic design, architecture, filmmaking, and the music of Underworld. We caught up with Graham Wood, Steve Baker, and Jason Kedgely and were able to get these kind gentlemen to 'speak up’.

Robert Rauschenberg for Designers

December 1st a major exhibition on Robert Rauschenberg opened at the Tate Modern in London, spanning six decades of his work. Rauschenberg (1925-2008) has...

Natalia Ilyin. Chasing the Perfect

A designer and design critic, Natasha Ilyin talked with Jason Tselentis of Under Consideration/Speak up about her great interest: the contemporary mythic imagery and symbols that designers manipulate, interpret, and act upon - often unconsciously.

Fluxus is a graphic designers dream

Focus on '60s art movement Fluxus, and its relevance to graphic design today

Austin Kleon. Show your work!

In his New York Times bestseller Steal Like an Artist, Austin Kleon showed readers how to unlock their creativity by “stealing” from the community...

George Lois. The defeat of habit by originality

George Lois is a pioneering advertising executive and designer best known for a series of covers he created for Esquire magazine between 1962 and 1972 (some of which were featured in an exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in 2008). He coined the phrase "I want my MTV!" created a new gourmet frozen foods marketing category with Lean Cuisine, and has devised memorable ads for companies ranging from Jiffy Lube to USA Today to Tommy Hilfiger. He is also the author of nine books about advertising and design, including "George, Be Careful," "$ellebrity," and "Iconic America."

Stefan Sagmeister on what he has learned

Rockstar designer Stefan Sagmeister delivers a short, witty talk on life lessons, expressed through surprising modes of design (including ... inflatable monkeys?).

Maeda @ Media

A review of John Maeda's monograph from 2000. A critical look at the book's design, and the philosophy and work of the new media...

Erik Spiekermann. Putting Back the Face into Typeface

Listen to the design genius talk about new visual languages, design processes, the analogies of music and typography, and why we need better client culture.

Peter Saville. Music and art

He has never made or produced a record, but Peter Saville is one of the most important people in British pop. Saville’s sleeve designs for OMD, Roxy Music and most famously, for Factory records have changed the way that we think about pop music. Along with his schoolfriend, Malcolm Garrett (the man responsible for the early Buzzcocks’ sleeves), Saville was a major player in a graphic design revolution that converged with the convulsions that were happening in pop at the end of the 1970s. If Jamie Reid’s cut and paste covers were the image equivalent of the punk sound, then Saville and Garrett’s more abstract, impersonal designs were the visual analogue of post-punk.

Peter Biľak. Typeface As Programme

Jürg Lehni and Peter Biľak in a conversation about the role of technology in type design, font formats and production tools, and Donald E. Knuth’s Metafont.