Fingerprint. The art of using handmade elements in graphic design

Design is at a turning point. Our infatuation with—and the backlash against—technology is over. Today's best designers have learned to embrace its advantages and...

Debbie Millman. How to think like a great graphic designer

Containing an interview line-up that is no doubt a who’s who list of contemporary graphic design, How to Think Like a Great Graphic Designercontains an...

Designers do bite back. Here come the Manifestos!

In the dead of winter hints of new beginnings lie low behind distant trees.December is a month of Big Final Words, set in Minor....

Chip Kidd. The Hilarious Art of Book Design

Chip Kidd doesn’t judge books by their cover, he creates covers that embody the book — and he does it with a wicked sense...

Stuart Tolley. Life as an agency owner, author and charity raiser

Stuart Tolley is an art director, designer and founder of Transmission, a creative agency and editorial consultancy based in sunny Brighton. He is also the author...

Jon Kolko. The Academic Interaction Designer

Jon Kolko’s career in design started with a secret desire to create CD covers. Jon went to school for industrial design where he learned about computer interaction, psychology, and computer science and developed a deep interest in interaction design. His career has since evolved working in a software enterprise, several start ups in Austin, TX, teaching and developing design curriculum at Savannah College of Art and Design, and working alongside Fortune 20 companies at Frog Design (Austin). It was these latter two roles that amplified Jon’s interests in academia, design education and the business of design.

Adrian Shaughnessy. How to be a graphic designer without loosing your...

What does it take to be a graphic designer in a time when the trappings of technology, fame, and fortune lure folks young and...

Doyald Young. There are no rules for a letter’s proportions

HIS BODY OF WORK IS SO ELEGANT, SO DISTINCTIVE, so perfect, that it transcends logo design, transcends the craft of making letters, and rises to a higher place, a place where letters dance with art. But you wouldn’t know this by talking to Doyald Young.

Scott Belsky. Making ideas happen

Ideas are worthless if you can't make them happen.Generating new ideas is easy, it's executing that is hard. Whether it's an everyday problem or...

Looking Closer 5: Critical Writings on Graphic Design

Looking Closer 5 (2007) The final installment in this acclaimed series offers astute and controversial discussions on contemporary graphic design from 2001 to 2005. This...

I Used to Be a Design Student: 50 Graphic Designers Then...

This book offers a rare chance to read what graphic designers feel about their education and profession. Fifty influential designers give the low-down about...

Hoefler & Frere-Jones. Font Men

You may not have heard of Jonathan Hoefler or Tobias Frere-Jones but you’ve seen their work. Before their recent split, they collectively ran the...

Matthew Carter. Embracing the wonderful pluralism of print and screen

Matthew Carter is one of the preeminent contemporary typographers. His work is both ubiquitous (his typefaces Georgia and Verdana were commissioned by Microsoft and now grace computer screens around the world) and revolutionary (his Walker Art Center commission resulted in the creation of a series of alphabets with “detachable” serifs). Carter has been involved in typography in one way or another for most of his life. He has lived through the passing of numerous typographic eras, and at each juncture he has embraced both the latest technology and the new forms created by young designers. In addition to teaching at Yale University School of Art in the Graphic Design department, Carter operates Carter & Cone, a typographic studio and consultancy based in Boston.

James Victore makes you want to swear

Passion. Unique. Raw. Personal. Daring. Bold. Idea. Shock. Reaction. That is what James Victore’s does. It confuses you. It makes you smile, frown, think. It screws you up. It makes you want to swear.

Ellen Lupton meets Steve Heller. Curator by accident

My position as a museum curator is a rare one—there are only a handful of design curators around the country, at institutions including the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. However, there are more and more opportunities for designers to develop and use their skills as writers/editors/publishers, and for literary people to engage the processes of design. This is a broader cultural development with relevance beyond my own particular experience.